Day #39: Themes

I’m grateful that nineteen years ago, Steven Palmquist, Vicki Semsch, and I decided we didn’t like making resolutions. Instead, we chose a theme for our personal year, one word or a phrase that we wanted to shape the coming months. This year, my word is “motion.” It holds meaning for me on many levels. I think the best themes do that. Last year, my theme was “joy.” I kept bringing my focus back to that inspiration throughout the year … it was a good choice. How about you? What is your theme for the coming year?

motion

Day #38: Conversation

Last night, as friends gathered around the table for dinner, I observed as people took turns listening, questioning, and conversing. Laughter, glistening tears, congratulations, surprise, and caring. I realized how grateful I am for conversation, face to face, no digital intrusion, no miles or pixels between us. It’s an emotional high that’s nearly impossible to replicate in any other way. Let’s sit down together soon and exchange news, thoughts, ideas, and our love for each other.


Day #37: Library of Congress

This photo is the background for my computer screen. You may recognize it as the main reading room at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. For me, it represents my dreams, goals, and ambitions. Reality and fantasy. Truth and fiction. The infinite possibility of discovery. I am grateful to the people who established this place that safeguards our knowledge and to those who carry on that mission. Do you follow them on Facebook? Something wonderful to behold each and every day.

Library of Congress main reading room

Day #31: Al Hirschfeld

I am endlessly fascinated by the creative mind and art of Al Hirschfeld, who crafted images of Broadway and other entertainment throughout his life, 1903-2003. His subject matter, his hidden Ninas, his perceptions … I am grateful he shared his talent with us. If you live near NYC, there is an exhibition of his work at New York City Center through March 3, 2019. This image is Patrick Stewart in “A Christmas Carol” from 1994.

View more of Hirschfeld’s art at The Al Hirschfeld Foundation.