Day #127: Gustav Klimt

I have long appreciated how the search for knowledge begins with one specific hook. As a young reader, I set off on some wacky journeys to learn everything I could about any number of topics, absorbing as much as I could, sometimes writing reports so I could do something with the knowledge, making my interest fit the assignment, but always feeling a hunger satisfied.

I am grateful to “Woman in Gold,” a good, not great, movie with Helen Mirren and Ryan Reynolds that follows the attempt to recover a stolen work of art. The movie led me to find out everything I could about artist Gustav Klimt. I had been been aware of him but that’s different than purposefully researching his life and learning about the influences on his art. This is the “Portrait of Adele Bloch Bauer,” finished with gold leaf. Isn’t it beautiful? 

Portrait of Adele Bloch Bauer, Gustav Klimt

Day #97: Our Coral Reefs

I am grateful for the research and awareness-raising that scientists, science writers, funders, and volunteers have committed to saving OUR coral reefs by recognizing the threats to their existence and developing new methods for rehabilitating the reefs that have been bleached. We can all help this vital part of our ecosystem, no matter how far away we live. This article, “Saving the Coral Reefs,” provides background, information about what’s being done, and concludes with contributions we can make. It’s our earth!

Saving Our Coral Reefs

Day #73: Factum Arte

If it weren’t for insects and lizards, archaeologist was high on my list of careers. The history, the discovery, understanding the connection between then and now. Today I am an armchair archaeologist, avidly following developments in the field. One aspect I could never align with my beliefs is removing items to a museum, oftentimes in another country. I am grateful to know that Factum Arte is reproducing artifacts without moving them, without endangering them, “accurate to one-tenth of a millimeter.” Their work is jaw-dropping, so be sure to watch the video. There are days that being a Luddite is highly appealing (except that I spend 12 hours a day on a computer), but Factum Art’s use of technology is a welcome advancement in archaeology.

Factum Arte workshop. Photo: CBS News

Day #45: Maud Hart Lovelace

Gratitude Journal Day #45: Maud Hart Lovelace wrote the Betsy-Tacy series and Emily of Deep Valley, books I read over and over again after my elementary school librarian placed them in my hands. But Maud also wrote historical fiction for adults, sometimes with her husband Delos W. Lovelace. They are based on research at the Minnesota Historical Society. I find them fascinating … a wondrous connection to the past. Of writing with her husband, Maud wrote, “As was usual in our collaborations, I did the research and Delos did most of the plotting. We shared the writing… amicably, too.” I am grateful to the people and publishers who are dedicated to making these books available many decades after they were written.